Tag Archives: blog

Washington Post on Tumblr

13 Mar

by Ian Kearney

@iankearney

 

This week the Washington Post launched @innovations, a Tumblr blog which recognises how social media is changing the way people interact with the news .

The goal ? Transparency. The blog which perfectly mirrors the newspaper’s own website aims to provide a new means for journalists to connect with readers as well as showcasing the papers new digital features.

@innovations by The Washington Post

In their first post here’s what @innovations had to say about the social media side of things;

“The news is social. Sites like Facebook and Twitter have fundamentally changed the way we discover relevant information, and led us to discover the power of the crowd.Amanda Zamora, social media and engagement editor, will be Tumbling about social platforms and tools that help drive realtime stories, build relevant conversation and engage readers. Follow her @amzam or e-mail her at amanda.zamora [at] wpost [dot] com.”

While its still early days to see how exactly the paper intends to use the blog, one of the posts entitled Mideast turmoil: behind the Post’s interactive map, gives a chance to engage with the processes that go on behind the scenes in creating the news and provides a richer, interactive experience for readers.

Its always positive to see the media embracing change and while although some might argue that the Washington Post has set up little more than a blog (and that lots of other newspapers have too) this could set the standard for the future of online journalism and social media/reader interaction.

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Burritos on Twitter – how social media helped create a news package

6 Feb

Caroline James @CarolineJames1

Over the past fortnight, I’ve managed to use social media in three different stages of the process of creating an item of TV news journalism.

It was through a classmate’s blog that I (as reporter) and my director discovered Richard Fitzgerald’s blog and his quest for love via the most unlikely of routes: the spicy Mexican burrito.

Richard had been using social media – his Twitter account to advertise and his blog to document – as Cupid in his pursuit of love.  The winner of a year’s supply of burrito vouchers in a social media event, the corresponding publicity surrounding his win led to him being inundated with requests from girls to help him out with all those burritos.

Exchanging tweets with the Burrito Bachelor!

Using Twitter we contacted him to ask whether he would be interested in us doing a news report on his unusual quest.

Direct messages were exchanged and the interview set up.  Meanwhile, we contacted the author of the initial source of the story, Charlie, to arrange an interview to get the inside scoop: how do the girls feel about being blogged about? Particularly as, by Richard’s own admission, all the details go up online, however negative.

We then set about scripting and shooting the package:

But it doesn’t end there.  Back in touch with our burrito bachelor via Twitter, we were able to send Richard the Vimeo link so he could see our report for himself.

Using Twitter to publicise our news package to Richard's followers, as well as our own

 

 

Posting our video to Twitter and FB, we maximised the number of people who could see the video and have even had our package embedded in Richard’s latest blog post. Significantly, the volume of traffic to Richard’s blog is enormous:

 

The blog for the burrito love quest gets a lot of action!

In such a way, we were able to exploit the huge local community Richard’s blog had already established, in order to increase our own journalistic presence.

This package was ABOUT social media and we were able to use social media to PURSUE it and then ultimately, to PUBLICISE our own journalism. Any means we can find to infiltrate an established online community and share examples of our TV journalism can only be an asset to the aspiring journo.

Since then, Richard’s burrito blog has appeared in print: both the Islington Gazette and Metro are as interested as us in the fate of his fast food quest for love!

With Valentine’s Day just a week away, perhaps we should all take note: burritos, not oysters, seem to be the latest aphrodisiac.

me and social media… a love/hate relationship

19 Dec

by Georgina Leggate

 @GeorginaLeggate

There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that there are many advantages to the ever-increasing world of ‘social media’.  Nowadays, no one wants to wait until Christmas before they can see their family; they want a Skype account that will allow them to communicate with people in places far and wide. I speak from experience: my brother (who is working in Abu Dhabi) and his girlfriend (who lives in London) have had a relationship on Skype for the past 6 months! I appreciate that social media plays a crucial part in online journalism, but I do find all my different social media ‘accounts’ incredibly distracting, disorienting and unavoidably addictive. Having said this, social media in online journalism is now not an option, it is something of a phenomenon and will inevitably play a huge part in my life and future as a journalist.

The 10 o’clock news is no longer good enough for the average Joe Blogger

Just like no one wants to wait for people, no one wants to, or is prepared to, wait for their update of the daily news. Yes, we have 24-hour news that brings us live broadcasts throughout the day, but it is no longer enough! Our generation (and in particular, our generation of ‘multi-platform journalists’) wants contact with the people. We want opinions. We want first-hand experiences. We want witnesses on the ground, at the crime scene, we want people that are snowed in, snowed out. We want instant calls, instant messaging and instant updates all with our instant cup-a-soup. And, what’s more, we don’t just want it, we now demand it and social media provides us with it.

I have been on my laptop for no longer than eight minutes and I have taken in more news, more celebrity gossip, more travel updates and more information than I would have done if I had sat for half an hour reading the newspaper. I have, admittedly, become slightly addicted to this ‘social media hub’ in which I have immersed myself.

Even as I write this blog, I am reading breaking news stories that are being updated faster than I can type. The words that news readers are speaking rapidly lose their value as someone else, somewhere else is revealing new information via Facebook, Twitter, My Space, Bebo, Delicious, the list goes on.

Smart phones

Handheld devices, which are inevitably linked to Twitter et al, will enable news and current affairs to be read faster than my blog will. Handheld devices such as the ‘smart phone’ can help us access news, quicker than the human body can: the movement of information is no longer paralysed by human limitation.

It’s got to be a good thing but why do I always feel that I am spending considerable amounts of time working on and adapting to my new online life?! Or is my enthusiasm misplaced? Is it merely because I am a beginner blogger, a tweetanger and a Facebook fresher? Only time will tell.

I have recently enrolled on a Television Journalism course at City University throughout which I am expected to spend more time on the Internet, watching television, updating my blog and ‘tweeting’ than I am sitting with my head in a book. Gone are the days where it was good enough to be able to ‘use the internet’. I now have to be able to know a multitude of sites like the back of my hand and in turn be able to compare and contrast them.

There is no longer a job for the journalist who says ‘I can’t do that. How do you tweet? What’s Delicious? I’m rubbish on computers’. Fact is, the keyboard is the new pen, Word is the new paper and social media is the new news broadcaster.